On managing the COVID-19 reality

Adaptation and Change

We differ in how we react to life experiences. We will differ in how we react to the COVID-19 experience. Try to not compare or judge yourself for being more or less this and that than others. So, you are more anxious, so be it. Embrace it, seek reassurance and support. So, you are a bit detached and disconnected from it all. We understand. It is your way of dealing with it.

Do your own thing. Evaluate the flood of advice out there, including this one, reject what does not fit and use what fits. To have your own approach is positive. It gives us a sense of agency and control amidst uncontrollable events. Enjoy and take pride in that!

On staying mentally stable and at peace

Find a way to process your feelings. You know how you do it and what works for you – talking to others, writing, reading, browsing through funny photos, reading jokes, watching comedies…Whatever your way is, it is essential that the emotions are let to be, talked about and hopefully validated by someone.

Move. I can’t stop saying it enough. The parks are open. The streets are available for walking. The weather is favorable. Spring is coming only in 3 days. Life goes on. Go out. A few times a day.

Have a news reception policy. You have full control over what information gets to you and how frequently. I strongly recommend limiting access to news updates to specific times and specific length. Unless you are enjoying it (and yes that is possible), it is likely that the news will keep you in a state of stress and anxiety. Do stay informed but do not overindulge. Entertain yourself with positive content, music, podcasts, or books.

Seek help. It is your responsibility to seek resources, including therapy. If you feel you want to but are unable to do it, tell someone who cares about you, and allow them to guide you towards getting help.

On working from home

Transitioning from the office to home is a big change. In normal circumstances, we would be allowed time to prepare and gradually adjust to this transition. That is not the case here. You might find yourself a little disoriented sitting in front of your laptop at home. There are a lot of online resources on adjusting to working from home. Here are a few quick pointers:

Get out of bed. Shower, get dressed, do your normal morning routine. Exit home and go for a little walk. Return and start working. Try to have a designated workplace.

Create your personal work policy, including times when you will be available, offline times for a break, walk, and lunch or reconnecting with your loved ones. And yes, you are allowed to have those.

Monitor how you feel. If you get emotionally overwhelmed, pause and move away from the computer. Do something else for a few minutes. Let your brain rest and reorganize.

The general sense of urgency and uncertainty will inevitably spill over the work environment. Give an extra thought to what is urgent and prioritize your work thoughtfully.

 Staying connected…and disconnected

The notion of self-isolation has quickly become a common phrase and an expected and required behavior. Self-isolation is neither natural, nor easy. It is essential that people in self-isolation due to travel, age or health conditions stay connected with their close ones through social media or phone. This requires a conscious effort, a change in attitude, preparation and care from their support group. Employers, family, and friends of quarantined individuals should keep this in mind and try to help with food and supplies. Make yourselves available for conversations and check-in with them frequently.

When the whole family is at home, including your children, creating sufficient space from each other is important for completing work activities. This is a big adjustment and may not work well at first. Couples should have conversations about their needs and work on creatively building an environment that makes all activities, including work possible.

On Community

All measures are aimed at preventing the further spread of the COVID-19 virus. That is all. No more and no less. If we keep this in mind and let it dictate our choices, we are making a great contribution to our community. As with the cold virus, sometimes we have to completely stop and just rest in order to start getting better. We have not stopped yet but we are getting there.

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